Two particles, one with charge −7.97×10−6 C and the other with charge 6.91×10−6 C, are 0.0359 m apart. What is the magnitude of the force that one particle exerts on the other?

Answers

Answer 1
Answer:

Answer:

-384.22N

Explanation:

From Coulomb's law;

F= Kq1q2/r^2

Where;

K= constant of Coulomb's law = 9 ×10^9 Nm^2C-2

q1 and q2 = magnitudes of the both charges

r= distance of separation

F= 9 ×10^9 × −7.97×10^−6 × 6.91×10^−6/(0.0359)^2

F= -495.65 × 10^-3/ 1.29 × 10^-3

F= -384.22N


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A friend tells you that a lunar eclipse will take place the following week, and invites you to join him to observe the eclipse through a high-powered telescope he owns. You are curious what the eclipse might look like from different perspectives in space. If the moon has a diameter of 2,159.14 miles, what is the maximum distance that it could be observed by the naked eye with enough detail that you could distinguish it from other celestial bodies (assuming that you have 20/20 vision)

Answers

Answer:

y = 80.2 mille

Explanation:

The minimum size of an object that can be seen is determined by the diffraction phenomenon, if we use the Rayleigh criterion that establishes that two objects can be distinguished without the maximum diffraction of a body coincides with the minimum of the other body, therefore so much for the pupil of the eye that it is a circular opening

          θ = 1.22 λ/ d

in a normal eye the diameter of the pupils of d = 2 mm = 0.002 m, suppose the wavelength of maximum sensitivity of the eye λ = 550 nm = 550 10⁻⁹ m

         θ = 1.22 550 10⁻⁹ / 0.002

         θ = 3.355 10⁻⁴ rad

Let's use trigonometry to find the distance supported by this angle, the distance from the moon to the Earth is L = 238900 mille = 2.38900 10⁵ mi

       tan θ = y / L

       y = L tan θ

       y = 2,389 10⁵ tan 3,355 10⁻⁴

       y = 8.02 10¹ mi

       y = 80.2 mille

This is the smallest size of an object seen directly by the eye

Final answer:

An individual with 20/20 vision can observe the moon from a maximum distance of around 6200 km or 3850 miles. Beyond this distance, it might be difficult to distinguish the moon from other celestial objects without using a telescope. The use of a telescope can expand this range significantly.

Explanation:

The detailed observation of a lunar eclipsed, when viewed without any form of optical aid like a telescope, is contingent on many factors, one of which is the human eye's angular resolution—the eye's ability to differentiate between two separate points of light. For an average human eye with 20/20 vision, the angular resolution is approximately 0.02 degrees.

To calculate the maximum distance at which the moon could be observed clearly with the eye, the formula for small angle approximation can be used, which in this context is: Distance = Size / Angle = (2159.14 miles) / (0.02 degrees in radians). This calculates to a distance of approximately 6200 km or 3850 miles.

Beyond this distance, distinguishing the moon from other celestial bodies might be challenging using just the eye. Utilizing a high-powered telescope would significantly extend this range by magnifying the image, allowing clearer detail over much greater distances.

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Answer all three parts and show work.

Answers

The distance for both Parts A and B are given in the question.

A balloon drifts 140m toward the west in 45s.

The wind suddenly changes and the balloon flies 90m toward the east in the next 25s.

To find the total distance, we can just add.

140 + 90 = 230m

Best of Luck!

State the following forms of electromagnetic radiation in increasing order of wavelength.Radiowaves, gamma rays, x-rays, infrared radiation, visible light​

Answers

Answer:

Gamma rays, x-rays, visible light, infrared radiation and radiowaves

Explanation:

Gamma rays, x-rays, ultraviolet, visible light, infrared radiation, microwave and radiowaves

The radius of Earth is 6370 km in the Earth reference frame. The cosmic ray is moving at 0.880Co relative to Earth.a. In the reference frame of a cosmic ray how wide does Earth seem along the flight direction?
b. In the reference frame of a cosmic ray how wide does Earth seem perpendicular to the flight direction?
Express your answer with the appropriate units.

Answers

Answer:

6052114.67492 m

12.742* 10^(6)\ m

Explanation:

v = Velocity of cosmic ray = 0.88c

c = Speed of light = 3* 10^8\ m/s

d = Width of Earth = Diameter of Earth = 12.742* 10^(6)\ m

When the cosmic ray is moving towards Earth then in the frame of the cosmic ray the width of the Earth appears smaller than the original

This happens due to length contraction

Length contraction is given by

d_e=d\sqrt{1-(v^2)/(c^2)}\n\Rightarrow d_e=12.742* 10^(6)\sqrt{1-(0.88^2c^2)/(c^2)}\n\Rightarrow d_e=6052114.67492\ m

The Earth's width is 6052114.67492 m

Contraction only occurs in the cosmic ray's frame of reference in the direction of the ray. But in perpendicular direction the width remains unchanged.

Hence, the width is12.742* 10^(6)\ m

A cart with mass 340 g moving on a frictionless linear air track at an initial speed of 1.2 m/s undergoes an elastic collision with an initially stationary cart of unknown mass. After the collision, the first cart continues in its original direction at 0.66 m/s. (a) What is the mass of the second cart? (b) What is its speed after impact?

Answers

Answer:

A) m2 = 98.71g

B) v_f2 = 1.86 m/s

Explanation:

We are given;

Mass of cart; m1 = 340g

Initial speed; v_i1 = 1.2 m/s

Final speed; v_f1 = 0.66 m/s

A)Since the collision is elastic, we can simply apply the conservation of momentum to get;

m1•(v_i1) = m1•(v_f1) + m2•(v_f2) - - - - - (eq1)

From conservation of kinetic energy, we have;

(1/2)m1•(v_i1)² = (1/2)m1•(v_f1)² + (1/2)m2•(v_f2)² - - - - eq(2)

Let's make v_f2 the subject in eq 2;

Thus,

v_f2 = √([m1•(v_i1)² - m1•(v_f1)²]/m2)

v_f2 = √([m1((v_i1)² - (v_f1)²)]/m2)

Let's put this for v_f2 in eq1 to obtain;

m2 = {m1((v_i1) - (v_f1))}/√([m1((v_i1)² - (v_f1)²)]/m2)

Let's square both sides to give;

(m2)² = {m1•m2((v_i1) - (v_f1))²}/([(v_i1)² - (v_f1)²]

This gives;

m2 = {m1((v_i1) - (v_f1))²}/([(v_i1)² - (v_f1)²]

Plugging in the relevant values to get;

m2 = {340((1.2) - (0.66))²}/([(1.2)² - (0.66)²]

m2 = 98.71g

B) from equation 1, we have;

m1•(v_i1) = m1•(v_f1) + m2•(v_f2)

Making v_f2 the subject, we have;

v_f2 = m1[(v_i1) - (v_f1)]/m2

Plugging in the relevant values to get;

v_f2 = 340[(1.2) - (0.66)]/98.71

v_f2 = 1.86 m/s

Final answer:

To determine the mass of the second cart and its speed after impact, we can use the principle of conservation of momentum. The initial momentum of the first cart is equal to its final momentum plus the momentum of the second cart. After calculating the mass of the second cart, we can use the conservation of momentum again to find its speed by equating the final velocity of the combined carts to the initial velocity of the first cart.

Explanation:

To determine the mass of the second cart, we can use the principle of conservation of momentum. The initial momentum of the first cart, with a mass of 340 g and an initial velocity of 1.2 m/s, is equal to its final momentum plus the momentum of the second cart. Using this equation, we can solve for the mass of the second cart.


After calculating the mass of the second cart, we can use the conservation of momentum again to find its speed after the impact. Since the two carts stick together after the collision, the final velocity of the combined carts is equal to the initial velocity of the first cart. Using this equation, we can solve for the speed of the second cart.

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Light from a lamp is shining on a surface. How can you increase the intensity of the light on the surface? Light from a lamp is shining on a surface. How can you increase the intensity of the light on the surface? A. Use a lens to focus the power into a smaller area. B. Increase the power output of the lamp. C. Either A or B.

Answers

Answer:

the correct option is C

Explanation:

The intensity of a lamp depends on the power of the lamp that is provided by the current flowing over it, therefore the intensity would increase if we raise the current.

Another way to increase the intensity is to decrease the area with a focusing lens, as the intensity is power over area, decreasing the area increases the power.

When we see the possibilities we see that the correct option is C